View this blog on your Mobile Device. Click here.

Monday, December 28, 2009

Feeding Time Should Be Calm and Happy

Many times, when we feed our dogs, it turns into a "watch out for your fingers" event. This should not be the case!.

We have to make sure that your doggie understands that you are the leader of the pack and that your are allowing him to eat. Here are some simple suggestions to make this happen:
  • Have your dog sit and stay before you present him with food.
  • ONLY present him with food from his food bowl.
  • Place his food bowl on the ground while he is still staying and not moving towards the bowl.
  • After you have placed the bowl down, stand tall and still. Then tell him it is OK to eat the food.
This will tell your doggie that you have "given him the food" instead that he has "taken the food".

For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Playing as Part of Training


You might not believe it, but playing is a critical part of your dog's training!


When you are playing with your dog, it all comes down to the rules you set and behavior your expect. Here are some tips:


  • Never engage in rough or overly exuberant play with a large or powerful dog. They will not understand that it is not OK to exhibit the same behavior. I don't think that you want your American Bulldog jumping on everyone coming into the house.

  • Don't play "Chase me! Chase me! / Tag You Are It!". This tells your dog that it is OK to always chase you and/or your guests and to "tag them". We tag someone by touching them on the shoulder. Dogs tag other dogs by jumping on them and nipping their fur. I am sure that you don't want this for your guests.

  • If you have a "hyper dog", don't play "Where is the birdie! Where is the birdie! Go get the Birdie!" with him. This encourages your dog being hyperactive both outside and inside.

  • Never play tug of war with your dog. This encourages him not to give you things back when you ask.

  • Play games like fetch or throw some goodies on the ground for him to forage. Give him Kong toys or other toys that stimulate his mind.

It all comes down to common sense. Do not encourage games that reward behaviors you do not want in your dog. Encourage games that reward your dog for maintaining your rules.

For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

A Quick Idea for Potty Training

Rover doesn't require 24 hour room service!

This is just a quick note for anyone working through the issue of potty training with your new puppy. Unless your Vet has told you that there is a medical reason why your puppy needs food and water all the time, don't do it. If you feed your doggie once or twice a day, that is fine.

When you put the food down, leave it down for no more than forty-five minutes. After that time, pick the food and water up. The meal is now done. This will help you to manage their intake and eventual outtake. You will now have a far better understanding of when they need to go to the bathroom, based on their eating habits.

For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

When You Ride Your Bike

Have you ever ridden your bike and have been chased by dogs? Don't worry. Here are some training tips for YOU!

Out doggies love to play "tag, you are it". When we ride past dogs on our bikes, they chase us, and we speed up, we are encouraging the idea of "tag, you are it". Here is what you do:
  • If you are on your bike and you are approaching a dog or a group of dogs, slow down to a "crawl". Try to peddle as little as possible. Look straight ahead and proceed past them in a very slow, constrained manner. The dogs should read your "body language" as "I don't want to play" and ignore you completely.
  • If the dog or dogs start to run after you, slow down and stop. You have taken away the "I want to play" language from your movements. The dog(s) should come up to you, possibly perform a slight sniff, and then return to where they were sitting.
  • If the dog(s) approach you in an aggressive manner (barking, showing of teeth, jumping), stop and get off your bike. Use the bike as a shield between you and the dogs. Always keep the bike between you and the dogs. Call for the owner to retrieve the dogs.
I have ridden my bike past a large number of dogs and have used these techniques and my bike rides have always been enjoyable.

For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Correcting your Doggie

"All dogs simply want to do the right thing and please us. Correcting them helps achieve that."

Some people perceive that correcting a dog is mean and harsh. Being respectful of their opinion, I have to strongly disagree. If you properly correct your dog when they are doing something wrong, you are guiding them in the right direction. This is really a productive action, not a punitive one.


  • When you correct your dog, you can only do it as they are doing something wrong. You can not correct them after the event has taken place. Dogs live in the "here and now". You must correct in the "here and now".
  • Do not yell and scream when you are correcting. Be calm, firm, and dominant.
For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Communicating with your Dog

Dogs don't speak English, Spanish, French, etc. So why should we think they would understand "Rover no! Get away from the food!"

Dogs have a much simpler communication process than humans. It is our challenge to understand how they talk and communicate to them in a way that they understand. Here is the secret: body language and voice tones. It is that simple.

Our body language helps us assert our leadership and dominance over our doggie. (Dominance doesn't mean that we want to scare our dog or be an evil dictator. It simply means that we want to assert that we are the teacher, the leader, the person keeping them safe.) Standing up helps us show our dominance.

Vocal tones help us direct our dog to understand the rules. Our biggest challenge here is to understand that words are really sounds. Animals use sounds to communicate and we have to be able to do the same thing to successfully communicate with our dogs.

The process is really very simple and quite fun. For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.