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Showing posts from February, 2010

Please, Please Don't Break the China...

Many times we wonder why our dog is always going crazy in the house...

I have been to many clients who always complain about their doggie going crazy for hours on end in the house. Carpets are pushed into the walls, plants are tipped over, plates are broken, and on and on and on. They say that the walk the dog two or three times a day and they still go crazy.

Dogs build up adrenaline during the day and they need an avenue to release it. Walking, unless you are on your bike or roller blading, will not effectively release the adrenaline. You need to get out to a fenced area where you can play fetch with your dog. You might think about taking a canine agility class. Why don't you take it too? We all still have those few extra pounds from the Holidays still lingering. As I already mentioned, you might try jogging or roller blading.

Be sure that you engage in these activities in the cooler hours of the day and be sure to have enough water for current hydration.

When you take charge…

Bark Busters Offers Tips to Introduce a New Dog to the Pack (Part 3 of 3)

Bark Busters provides tips to help pet owners introduce a new dog to their current pack of animals with ease.

Bringing a new dog into the family is an exciting time for the human “pack” members but can create stress for the non-human pack. This is the third of three training tips to make sure that the process is relaxed and safe for both human and canine members of the pack:

Introduce in a Neutral Location
Introduce the dogs in a neutral location that is unfamiliar to both dogs, such as a park. This prevents your resident dog from feeling his territory is being threatened.

Each dog should be on a loosely held six-foot leash and handled by a separate person. Try to stay relaxed so the dogs don’t pick up on any tension you might be feeling.

Don’t force an interaction between the dogs. Just walk near each other for a few minutes. One or both of the dogs may ignore each other, which is fine. Just stay upbeat and give the dogs time to get comfortable with the situation.

Well, there you have it. …

Bark Busters Offers Tips to Introduce a New Dog to the Pack (Part 2 of 3)

Bark Busters provides tips to help pet owners introduce a new dog to their current pack of animals with ease.

Bringing a new dog into the family is an exciting time for the human “pack” members but can create stress for the non-human pack. This is the second of three training tips to make sure that the process is relaxed and safe for both human and canine members of the pack:

Dog to Dog
Before you bring the new dog (or puppy) home, bring home his scent so your resident pets can be introduced to his smell first. Rub the new dog with a cloth or use a blanket he has slept on and bring it into your home and place it where he will be sleeping.

In addition, be sure both your resident dog and the new dog are up to date on their vaccinations to avoid any risk of infection.

For more information, please contact The Best Dog Trainers in South Florida.

Bark Busters Offers Tips to Introduce a New Dog to the Pack (Part 1 of 3)

Bark Busters provides tips to help pet owners introduce a new dog to their current pack of animals with ease.

Bringing a new dog into the family is an exciting time for the human “pack” members but can create stress for the non-human pack. This is the first of three training tips to make sure that the process is relaxed and safe for both human and canine members of the pack:

General tips:Set reasonable goals when you bring a new dog into your pack. Knowing the dogs’ backgrounds as to how well they were socialized will help you manage what might happen. Remember and respect that your resident dog and/or cat may perceive the new dog to be encroaching on their established territory, which can be very stressful.

Proceed slowly and calmly. Slow-paced introductions may help prevent any fear-based or aggressive reactions from developing. If bad behaviors are not reined in from the start, they can become habit and be very hard to change in the future.

Never leave new pets unattended, even if a pe…

Crate Training, A Den within a Den (Part 3)

This is the third installment on Crate Training. Today we are going to talk about using the crate for House Breaking.
A dog’s instinct is not to potty where they sleep or eat. Proper use of the crate can really speed up the house breaking process.The crate should be only large enough for your puppy to stand up, turn around and lay down. This will help the your puppy develop bladder control. Do not place any bedding in the crate. Since most puppies don’t like sitting in their mistakes, this is great way to help them develop that needed control. Bedding absorbs the urine and makes it less uncomfortable for the your puppy.Feed your puppy in the crate. Scatter food on the floor of the crate. Not only is this fun for the puppy, but it also helps deter mistakes in the crate.Puppies are easily distracted outside, and may forget to go potty. If this is the case, place your puppy in crate for 10-15 minutes, then take him back outside. This helps avoid the very common problem of the puppy g…

Crate Training, A Den within a Den (Part 2)

We are now at the second installment of our "Crate Training". Let's see what we need to accomplish now...
How you introduce your dog to its crate is very important.

You want to create a positive, pleasant association with her crate so that she will enjoy spending time there.

Place a worn t-shirt or other piece of clothing or bedding in the crate. The “pack” smell will help comfort the dog.
Create a comforting environment by covering three sides of the crate.

Encourage him to investigate by placing toys, treats, food and water inside.

Lavish him with praise when he enters the crate on his own.

Leave the door open at first, then start closing the door when he is occupied or napping.

Do not remove from crate if whines, wait until he is quite. Otherwise, you will be teaching him that whining works to get his way.
Remember to keep it slow so that you give him time to acclimate the crate as his happy place. That is the key to success.

For more information, please contact The Best Do…