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Saturday, August 31, 2013

Keep Your Dog Safe and Protected from Thieves

I have heard horrible stories of dogs being stolen and never found again.  What can I do to protect my dog from being stolen?



In recent years there has been an increased level of dog theft.  Some organizations have indicated that dog theft has increased by as much as 32%.

People steal pets for a variety of reasons:
  • Some are simply looking for a dog and don't want to pay the price charged by the breeder or pet store.  
  • Others are looking for dogs that they can sell.  Dogs can easily sell for up to $3,000 or $4,000 on the open market. 
  • Others steal the dog and then wait for the reward posters to be placed in the neighborhood.  It is amazing how often Fido just happens to wander into a stranger's back yard with no tags or other form of identification.
  • Dogs are stolen to use in fighting clubs. This is probably the most disturbing and distressing of all the reasons your dog is stolen.

Having a dog stolen is horrendous for both the owner and the dog.  A once well behaved dog, if found, can turn into a fearful/aggressive animal.  They can become aggressive around people or other animals.  They might attack with no warning or sit, shaking with fear, in the corner of the room.  Your once, happy companion, has returned to you with a level of anxiety and fear that might never be reversed.

So what can you, the pet owner do to try and minimize your pet being stolen?
  • Make sure your dog is micro chipped and has a collar tag.  You also might think about a GPS locator on their collar.
  • Never leave your dog in a public place.
  • Never leave your dog alone for any length of time in the back yard or front yard.
  • Be aware of any strangers who take too much interest in your dog.  If they are asking too many questions regarding your dog's breed, age, lineage, health, temperament; they might "be shopping".
  • Make sure that you have thoroughly checked the background of your dog walker.  Are they bonded? What are their references? Does your vet know anything about them?
If your dog has been stolen/missing:
  • Make sure that you contact the police or the appropriate local animal control authorities.
  • Make flyers with your dog's picture and canvas the neighborhood.  Place flyers in vet hospitals, doggie grooming stores, pet stores, supermarkets, etc.
  • Contact the local radio and TV stations to see if they have places on their web sites to post your dog's information.
  • Contact and check the local dog shelters to see if your dog has been surrendered.
  • Check Internet Databases such as www.FidoFinder.com to register your dog and to see if anyone has listed him as found.


Having anything stolen from us, especially our family dog, is a terrible experience. Getting them back is very difficult and many times, impossible.  The best solution is to proactively take the appropriate precautions outlined above.  Keeping your dog safe and secure provides for their well being and is just the smart thing to do.  As always, you can contact your local Bark Buster Dog Trainer for more information and suggestions at Best Dog Training in SouthFlorida.

1 comment:

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